Resources

Access to Health Care:

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Disabilities and Chronic Health Conditions:

  • This report summarizes presentations made during the People of Color Strand at the 2005 TASH Conference in 2005.  The issue of disabilities in communities of color have gone undressed, especially for African Americans. This report highlights health, educational and community/social service issues and challenges faced by people of color with significant disabilities and their families.
  • Changing the Landscape: Depression Screening and Management in Primary Care
    A look at the mental health treatment disparities among the many racial and ethnic health disparities that must be addressed and the effort by the NY City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to make depression screening and effective treatment of depression standard practice in all primary care settings throughout the city.
  • Racial/Ethnic Differences in Body Mass Index, Morbidity and Attitudes Toward Obesity among U.S. Adults describes racial and ethnic differences by gender in body mass index (BMI). The study examines the relationship between current morbidity and BMI and also assesses racial and ethnic disparities in attitudes toward and perceptions about obesity. (August 2006, JNMA)
  • Growing Racial Disparity in Breast, Colorectal Cancer Deaths over Past Decade reports that the mortality rate in the United States due to cancer is much higher among African Americans than whites, despite an overall decline in the rate of cancer deaths during the last several years. While the decline in cancer death rates is encouraging, the increasing disparity is cause for concern and highlights the particular importance of early cancer detection for African Americans. (August 2005)

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General Health Disparities:

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Health Provider Issues:

  • In response to a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Call for Papers, the NMA drafted and submitted a white paper on pay-for-performance (P4P). Click here to read the NMA position paper on pay-4-performance. (2006)
  • HMO Employment and African-American Physicians assesses the level and determinants of African American physicians’ employment in health maintenance organizations (HMOs), particularly early in their careers. Such an analysis is significant because, in most sectors of the economy, larger organizations consistently provide better jobs, higher pay, and improved career prospects. In contrast, staff- and group-model HMOs from the time period of this study have been associated with resource and autonomy constraints, ranking low in remuneration, prestige, and stability. The study suggests that the over-representation of African American physicians in staff- and group-model HMOs may contribute to the inequalities they experience. (August 2006, The Journal of the National Medical Association (JNMA))
  • Physicians’ Ethical Responsibilities in Addressing Racial and Ethnic Healthcare Disparities explores the ethical obligations of individual physicians and the medical profession in addressing racial and ethnic disparities in health care. The article also discusses the need for physicians to recognize disparities and to critically examine their own practices to ensure that their clinical judgments are not adversely affected by issues of race and ethnicity. (August 2006, JNMA)
  • Cultural Competence Primer is the National Medical Association’s guide to cultural competence and its role in the health care and social service fields. The guide focuses on defining cultural competence, describing how it affects health care, and suggesting how better cultural understanding can improve the health of diverse populations. In addition, the guide proposes a strategy for developing a national board for ethno-cultural medicine to improve health care delivery to people of color, and it provides recommendations for system-wide changes that could improve minority health. (2002)

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Juvenile Justice System:

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Men of Color:

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Social Determinants of Health:

  • The Impact of Food Insecurity on the Development of Young Low-Income Black & Latino Children explores how higher rates of poverty in households with children can lead to food insecurity, a condition in which a household cannot obtain enough food for all household members to lead healthy and active lives. Food insecurity puts children at risk for developmental difficulties, such as failing to develop age-appropriate cognitive, language, and motor skills, and also can lead to behavioral and learning problems. (May 2006)

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Tools for Advocates:

  • Dare to Get Involved: How to Take Action: What can you do to help raise awareness about minority health policy issues, such as health disparities and uninsurance? Click here to find out!
  • Working with the Faith Community: Reflections from a National Faith Leader is a tool for advocates that identifies several tips and practical strategies for engaging and working with the faith community around health care issues. Drawing from her work with congregations that represent communities of color, Barbara Baylor, Minister for Health and Wellness at the national office for the United Church of Christ, reflects on how to engage the faith community as an effective way to improve health care. (March 2006)
  • Making Public Programs Work for Communities of Color: An Action Kit for Community Leaders is an Action Kit designed to provide community leaders with the information, tools, and resources necessary to engage in health advocacy and improve the health and well-being of their communities. (January 2006)

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Tools for Journalists:

  • Public Programs and Minorities: A Resource Kit for Journalists was created in an effort to provide journalists with the information, tools, and resources they need to report on important health care issues and their impact on the communities they serve. It includes an overview of public health programs, fact sheets onMedicaidMedicare, and Latino health, quick facts on disparities in healthhealth care, andaccess, and additional resources for journalists. These resources are also available in Spanish.
  • Health Disparities Conference Call for Journalists: Families USA hosted a conference call with author and journalist Madeline Drexler. Tailored for journalists, this call focused on Ms. Drexler’s experience covering health disparities, tips and tools for journalists who cover this beat, and her past and current projects, including her Boston Globe article, How Racism Hurts-Literally. A replay of the call is now available online. RealPlayer (RealPlayer 8 or later) | Windows Media (Windows Media Player 9 or later) (October 26, 2007)

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Other Resources and Opportunities:

  • Minority Health Connection is a monthly e-newsletter designed to keep advocates connected to the most pressing issues affecting minority health. Sections include the latest resources in minority health, the impact of health policy issues on communities of color, and highlights from activists in the field who are addressing racial and ethnic health disparities. Click here to begin receiving this monthly publication.
  • Fair Health Journalism Fellowship
    In keeping with the Alliance’s goal to build and maintain a comprehensive network of print and broadcast journalists, The Joint center Health Policy Institute launched its “Fair Health Journalism Fellowship”. HPI’s Fellows will write newspaper op-eds and other articles and will report on promising interventions and policies that can reduce health inequities. Articles derived from these pieces will be aimed at an informed, mainstream reading audience, and will be published in general interest magazines and newspapers. Journalism Fellows will complete magazine stories and numerous shorter op-eds and informational articles on health disparities in the form of narrative journalism that highlight major events, news stories, and “think” pieces analyzing current trends. This is a one year fellowship. All Fellowship positions have been filled at this time. For more information on the fellowship program, please contact Carla Gullatt, Director of Operations and Outreach Office of Health, Women and Families, The Joint Center for Political & Economic Studies atcgullatt@jointcenter.org.
  • Joint Center Scholar Leads Fair Health Movement announces a grant awarded to the Joint Center to create the Health Policy Institute, a specialized research institute designed to focus attention on key health policy issues that affect African Americans and other minority communities. The announcement highlights the work of the Institute’s leader, Dr. Gail Christopher, and her important role in both the black community and the minority health field. (October 2005)
  • Focus: A Magazine of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies is a regular publication from the Joint Center. The September/October 2005 edition introduces the Health Policy Institute and contains articles that primarily focus on health issues that affect communities of color. (September/October 2005)

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